February is American Heart Month   Leave a comment

February is American Heart Month. Learn about heart disease in women and what you can do to keep a healthy heart.

Get Informed: Facts on Women and Heart Disease

  • Heart disease is the leading cause of death for women in the United States.
  • Although heart disease is sometimes thought of as a “man’s disease,” around the same number of women and men die each year of heart disease in the United States.
  • Some conditions and lifestyle choices increase a person’s chance for heart disease, including diabetes, overweight and obesity, poor diet, physical inactivity, and excessive alcohol use.
  • High blood pressure, high LDL (low-density lipoprotein) cholesterol, and smoking are key risk factors for heart disease. LDL is  considered the “bad” cholesterol because having high levels can lead to buildup in your arteries and result in heart disease and stroke. Lowering your blood pressure and cholesterol and not smoking will reduce your chances for heart disease.

Symptoms

While some women have no symptoms of heart disease, others may experience heavy sharp chest pain or discomfort, pain in the neck/jaw/throat, or pain in the upper abdomen or back. Sometimes heart disease may be silent and not diagnosed until a woman has signs or symptoms including:

  • Heart Attack: Chest pain or discomfort, upper back pain, indigestion, heartburn, nausea/vomiting, extreme fatigue, upper body discomfort, and shortness of breath.
  • Arrhythmia: Fluttering feelings in the chest.
  • Heart Failure: Shortness of breath, fatigue, swelling of the feet/ankles/legs/abdomen.
  • Stroke: Sudden weakness, paralysis (inability to move) or numbness of the face/arms/legs, especially on one side of the body. Other symptoms may include confusion, trouble speaking or understanding speech, difficulty seeing in one or both eyes, shortness of breath, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination, loss of consciousness, or sudden and severe headache.
Stethoscope with plastic heartHealthy Hearts

Heart disease is largely preventable.
Listen to CDC’s Dr. Bowman discuss ways to prevent heart problems.
[00:04:06 minutes]

What You Can Do for Heart Health

You can lower your chance of heart disease and a heart attack by taking simple steps.

  • Eat a healthy diet with fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and fat-free or low-fat milk and milk products. Choose foods low in saturated fats, cholesterol, salt (sodium), and added sugars.
  • Exercise regularly. Adults needs 2 hours and 30 minutes (or 150 minutes total) of exercise each week. You can spread your activity out during the week, and can break it up into smaller chunks of time during the day.
  • Be smokefree. If you are ready to quit, call 1-800-QUIT-NOW (1-800-784-8669) or 1-855-DÉJELO-YA (1-855-335-3569 for Spanish speakers) for free resources, including free quit coaching, a free quit plan, free educational materials, and referrals to other resources where you live.
  • Limit alcohol use, which can lead to long-term health problems, including heart disease and cancer. If you do choose to drink, do so in moderation, which is no more than one drink a day for women. Do not drink at all if you are pregnant.
  • Know your family history. There may be factors that could increase your risk for heart disease and stroke.
  • Manage any medical condition you might have. Learn the ABCS of heart health. Keep them in mind every day and especially when you talk to your health provider:
    • Appropriate aspirin therapy for those who need it
    • Blood pressure control
    • Cholesterol management
    • Smoking cessation

From http://www.cdc.gov/features/wearred/index.html

Happy New Year   Leave a comment

happy 2016

Posted January 1, 2016 by MaryO in Holidays

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Happy New Year from Power Surge   Leave a comment

Screenshot 2015-12-29 07.39.59

Dearest’s original post is here: http://powersurge.invisionzone.com/index.php?/topic/2838-new-years-resolutions-oh-no/?p=34928

This video was originally posted on the PS boards by LadyViktoria December 31, 2017.  She said “If you don’t watch this to the end, you’ll miss the best.”

Enjoy!

Posted January 1, 2016 by MaryO in Holidays, Message Boards

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Happy Hanukkah   Leave a comment

hanukkah

 

Hanukkah 2015 began at sunset on Sunday, December 6, and ends on Monday, December 14.

Hanukkah is the Festival of Lights.

It commemorates the victory of the ancient Israelites over the Syrian Greek army, and the subsequent miracle of restoring the menorah in the Holy Temple in Jerusalem.

The miracle of Hanukkah is that only one vial of oil was found with just enough oil for one day, and yet it lasted for eight full days.

Posted December 7, 2015 by MaryO in Holidays

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Happy Thanksgiving   Leave a comment

thanksgiving-white

 

“Once you start practicing being grateful and thankful for things, people, and events, you may notice that you start to attract more positive things, people, and events in your life.”
~ Stephanie Conkle, Happy Person. Happy Life

Posted November 26, 2015 by MaryO in Holidays

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New Study for People with Mild to Moderate Alzheimer’s Disease   Leave a comment

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The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the study medication can help people with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s Disease improve their mental abilities such as understanding, reasoning, and judgment. The study medication will be given together with an FDA-approved Alzheimer’s medication: Aricept® (donepezil), Exelon® (rivastigmine) or Razadyne® (galantamine).

More about the study:

  • The study drug (MK-7622) is administered in the form of one capsule a day in the morning.
  • There will be 830 participants in this trial

If you are interested, please find the full study details and eligibility criteria listed here.

Eligibility Criteria:

Participants must:

  • be between 55 – 85 years old
  • be diagnosed with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s Disease (12 – 24 MMSE)
  • have a trial partner who is able to attend any study visits that require assessment
  • be currently taking a stable daily dose of acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (AChEI) such as Aricept® (donepezil), Exelon® (rivastigmine patch oral), or Razadyne® (galantamine)

Participants must not:

  • have a history of seizures or epilepsy within the last 5 years
  • have a history of mental illness
  • have been diagnosed or treated for cancer within the past 5 years (excluding basal cell, squamous cell skin cancer, in situ cervical cancer and localized prostate cancer)

Please complete the online questionnaire to check if you’re eligible for the trial.

If you’re not familiar with clinical trials, here are some FAQs:

What are clinical trials?

Clinical trials are research studies to determine whether investigational drugs or treatments are safe and effective for humans. All new investigational medications and devices must undergo several clinical trials, often involving thousands of people.

Why participate in a clinical trial?

You will have access to new investigational treatments that would be available to the general public only upon approval. You will also receive study-related medical care and attention from clinical trial staff at research facilities. Clinical trials offer hope for many people and an opportunity to help researchers find better treatments for others in the future.

Learn why I’m talking about this Clinical Trial

Women’s heart attack symptoms are confusing   Leave a comment

Not from Alice OR Power Surge but important information for women.

/ Friday, November 13, 2015

DEAR DR. ROACH: My question is about symptoms for women’s heart attacks. I have always heard that symptoms for women can be much different from men’s. Instead of the chest-clutching, sharp pain that men can have, I have read that women’s symptoms can be any of these: heartburn or indigestion; pain in the jaw, neck, shoulders, back, one or both arms; fatigue and troubled sleep; dizziness and nausea; or extreme anxiety. Are you KIDDING me? I am a healthy, active 63-year-old woman. I have had all of these symptoms at one time or another. If I acted every time I had one of these symptoms, I would be at the doctor’s office every day. How is one to know which symptoms to take seriously and act on immediately, and which to wait a few days to see if it is temporary?

Thank you for addressing this confusing issue. — J.

ANSWER: I have seen many letters similar to yours. The confusing problem is that it’s true: In women, heart attack symptoms and the symptoms of angina before a heart attack can include all of those vague symptoms. The same is true of men as well, although it’s more likely for women than for men to have symptoms other than the classic left-sided chest discomfort (people are much more likely to describe angina as “discomfort” or “pressure” than “pain”).

So your question is entirely valid: How do you know when to take common symptoms seriously? The first thing I would say is that the greater your risk for heart disease, the more seriously you should take any symptom. Age, family history of heart disease, high blood pressure and cholesterol, lack of regular physical exercise and diabetes are among the most important risk factors.

The second thing I would say is to take new symptoms seriously. If you never get heartburn, for example, then heartburn at age 63 should prompt concern.

Third, context matters. Symptoms such as nausea or jaw pain that occur with exercise — even carrying a bag of groceries or walking up stairs — is definitely a reason to talk to your doctor.

Most women don’t know that heart disease remains their No. 1 killer, far outstripping breast cancer (or any cancer). Both women and men need to take even vague symptoms seriously, especially if the symptoms are new, exertional or if the person has several risk factors. As a primary-care doctor, I’d rather see my patient for her concerns that symptoms may be heart disease than see her in the ICU with a heart attack.

From http://health.heraldtribune.com/2015/11/13/womens-heart-attack-symptoms-are-confusing/

Posted November 18, 2015 by MaryO in From Elsewhere

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